Getting to Tomorrow: Ending the Overdose Crisis

Beyond COVID-19

WATCH VIDEO

Community dialogues bringing Canadians together to realize a shared vision for change to address the overdose crisis. Select from the communities in the map below to learn about the issues and people at the heart of this crisis—and solutions to it. #GettingToTomorrow

Contact Us to Book an Event

Latest Blog Posts

Why communities of faith should support harm reduction

What would Jesus do? Why communities of faith should support harm reduction

Primary health care providers play an important role in the overdose crisis

Doctors and health care professionals have an incredible potential for positive change at both an individual and societal level. The actions they take and endorse legitimize the evidence-based public health interventions that need to happen. And when they do, they will save lives.

Words are a Powerful Weapon

The dehumanizing effects of stigma push people to the margins of our society where help and security are much harder to find.

New Brunswick: Recommendations for Change

From housing without waitlists to responsive services that come to the community instead of appointments, this is what community members in New Brunswick said must change.

It starts with stigma: Summary of New Brunswick public health dialogue

“People using drugs have to wait until the system is ready for them.” Services and support should be ready when and where they are needed.

Tracks Survey of People Who Inject Drugs

A total of 200 individuals in New Brunswick took part in the Tracks survey for people who inject drugs

Addressing the syndemic of HIV, Hepatitis C, Overdose, and COVID-19 Among People Who Use Drugs

The criminalization of personal drug use marginalizes people who use drugs (PWUD), affecting their life, liberty, and security.

Expertise of people who use drugs must be central to design of safe supply

If people who use drugs are not meaningfully involved, the quality of the research and its impact on policy and service delivery is likely to suffer.

Why I overdosed during the pandemic, and why I survived

COVID-19 has created havoc for people who use drugs—and that obviously includes me.

Why businesses should be on board with harm reduction

Harm reduction and progressive drug policies mean community safety for everyone, including businesses

The case for supervised consumption and overdose prevention sites

Over 100 evidence-based, peer-reviewed studies have consistently proven the positive impacts of supervised consumption services

Canadian Drug Policy Coalition launches national dialogue series on the overdose crisis and COVID-19

Finding common ground and shared meaning to realize solutions to the overdose crisis. A public health and human rights-based approach.

Canada’s current approach to substances

Rather than being benign tools aimed at promoting the health of Canadians, drug laws introduced in the early 1900s were meant for social control and targeted certain groups of people, including Asian immigrants, people of colour, and Indigenous people.

What is harm reduction?

Harm reduction saves lives and connects people with vital social services, health care, and stability.

Considering alternative drug policies: decriminalization and legal regulation

Legal regulation would create safer communities for everyone. It would greatly reduce overdose, weaken high-level organized crime, and keep drugs away from youth.

What is a public health and human rights approach to substances?

By changing the way we see and frame substance use, we can move towards a system of laws and policies that will prevent harm and death.

The impact of stigma

Stigma can create real and tangible harms for people who use drugs. We can help or harm through our words and behaviours.

Outcomes of our current approach to substances

The system is failing and fuelling overdose deaths, violence, and organized crime.

"You cannot arrest your way out of an opioid crisis."

Dr. Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer of Canada (The Canadian Press, Aug. 23, 2020)

"Everybody needs a safe place to use, and they need a safe drug to use."

Matt Bonn, Canadian Association of People Who Use Drugs (CBC, Oct. 6, 2020 / Photo credit: Caora McKenna)

"The evidence shows us that supervised consumption sites and services save lives and can provide people who use drugs with access to health and social services and treatment."

Hon. Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, Canada (The Canadian Press, Aug. 20, 2020)

"We need to put as much time and effort and kindness and compassion into caring for people who use drugs as we have been successful in doing in responding to the COVID-19 crisis."

Dr. Bonnie Henry, Provincial Health Officer of British Columbia (Global News, July 16, 2020)

"A person’s worth isn’t based on the substances they put in their body and it doesn’t help when we push them away."

Erica Thomson Peer Coordinator at Fraser Health

Erica Thomson, Peer Coordinator (Fraser Health, May 14, 2018)

"Stigmatizing and criminalizing those affected by substance use disorders is an ineffective strategy that often increases harm."

Elaine Hyshka, Assistant Professor, School of Public Health, University of Alberta (Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Sept. 26, 2019)