Community Partner: L’Association des intervenants en dépendance du Québec (AIDQ)

AIDQ is a non-profit organization that includes stakeholders from all sectors interested in the field of addictions in Quebec, such as the public, private and community sectors, public health and social services, education, universities, research, public safety and the workplace. AIDQ’s mission is to promote and support intervention in the areas of prevention, harm reduction, treatment and the social reintegration of people with addictions and those at risk of becoming addicted, through skills development, information, collaboration and the sharing of expertise. Read More

Support drug policies based on evidence and compassion.

Getting to Tomorrow is a project of Canadian Drug Policy Coalition. Sign up for their monthly newsletter to get updates on the project and learn more about drug policy and how you can take action for change.

Latest Blog Posts

Coalition of local and national harm reduction and drug policy organizations push for policy change at public health dialogue on overdose/drug poisoning crisis

Bringing together leaders from diverse sectors of society to identify and move towards policy solutions to the overdose/drug poisoning crisis.

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The whole community benefits from a ‘safe supply’ approach to substances

Reforming our policies on the use of illegal substances can save individual lives — but also help our neighbourhoods thrive.

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I don’t judge you for yours, don’t judge me for mine

Who are you to judge us on our addiction?

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Coalition of local and national harm reduction and drug policy organizations seek solutions to Canada’s overdose crisis at Ottawa’s first-ever public health dialogue on rising drug toxicity deaths and policy solutions

Opioid-related deaths have nearly doubled in Ottawa during the COVID-19 pandemic. | Getting to Tomorrow Ottawa

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A friend of mine has died today

Criminalization, stigmatization and ugly looks put her in a grave. All because she used a drug. Does not mean she wasn’t brave

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Why decriminalize drugs?

“I stopped doing dangerous drugs in a dangerous fashion the first time my drug use was treated as a means to cope, a health issue—and was being treated as such—rather than a crime.”

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We are more than you think we are

We are beautiful, loving, caring, worthy and hopeful souls who deserve a life to live.

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Local harm reduction and drug policy organizations seek solutions to Hamilton’s overdose crisis at first-ever public health dialogue on drug toxicity deaths and policy change

“We urgently need Hamiltonians to understand that people who use drugs are part of our community, and we deserve to be part of creating a city where our lives matter.”

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A War on Drugs or a War on People?

Why is a safe supply of drugs that keeps people alive and safe, determined by the morals and perspectives of the public?

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Just a Part of Me

Addiction is only a part of me. So take the time to listen, and you may learn a thing or two about who I really am.

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Harm Reduction & COVID

Harm Reduction & COVID

three people holding up signs at the safe supply rally in Vancouver, 2020

Resources for communities responding to dual health crises

News & Updates

News & Updates

Naloxone label

Montreal police officers now trained, equipped with naloxone (Global)

Paramedic

Public health officials say Montreal now facing opioid crisis (CBC)

Montreal skyline

New drug on Montreal's streets even more potent than fentanyl (CTV)

After a death, Montreal issues alert about blue 'counterfeit' Percocet new to city's black market (CTV)

Close up of uncut cocaine

A spike in deaths caused by drug overdose alarms Montreal public health experts (CTV)

Close up of syringe lying on paper next to white powder substance

Montreal Is Experiencing a Rash of Fatal Overdoses and No One Knows Why (VICE)

Close up of hands holding a vial written fentanyl citrate

More fentanyl deaths in Montreal? (CJAD)

Naloxone supplies spread out on a white table

Montreal police still not equipped with naloxone, despite surge in overdoses (Global News)

Man outside with black hat and sweater

Montreal's CACTUS safe-injection community group sees more overdoses amid pandemic (CBC)